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Matching O2 Delivery to O2 Demand in Muscle: II. Allometric Variation in Energy Demand

  • C. Richard Taylor
  • Kim E. Longworth
  • Hans Hoppeler
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 227)

Abstract

This paper and the preceding paper by Weibel and Kayar address the question of whether, or to what extent, the structures involved in O2 consumption and delivery are matched to each other. This match between structure and function is a “common sense” prediction of economic design. We have given this principle the name symmorphosis, defining it as a state of structural design commensurate to functional needs resulting from regulated morphogenesis (Taylor and Weibel), 1981.

Keywords

Pressure Head Functional Parameter Adaptive Variation Energetic Demand Muscle Mitochondrion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Richard Taylor
    • 1
  • Kim E. Longworth
    • 1
  • Hans Hoppeler
    • 1
  1. 1.C.F.S., Museum of Comparative ZoologyHarvard UniversityBedfordUSA

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