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Matching O2 Delivery to O2 Demand in Muscle: I. Adaptive Variation

  • Ewald Weibel
  • Susan R. Kayar
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 227)

Abstract

This paper and the following one by C.R. Taylor et al. report an attempt to look at the conditions for O2 delivery from the atmosphere to the mitochondria in muscle cells in an integrated approach, and this in a double sense: 1) we look at all steps in the transfer pathway that leads from the lung through the circulation and the microvasculature to the O2 consumption site in the mitochondria; 2) we consider both the structural design and the functional performance at each step. In addition, we are interested mostly in what is happening at very high levels of O2 consumption, first because under these conditions 90-95% of \(\rm\dot{v}\) O2 occurs in the muscles, so we know the target for O2 entering the system at the lung, and second because the limit to VO2 is of particular interest in this context. We would like to know at what level in the respiratory system is this limit set and for what reasons, physiological or structural.

Keywords

Adaptive Variation Energetic Demand Mitochondrial Volume Great Oxygen Capillary Volume 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ewald Weibel
    • 1
  • Susan R. Kayar
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnatomyUniversity of BerneBerne 9Switzerland

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