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Electromagnetic Thawing of Organs: A Multidisciplinary Challenge

  • W. A. G. Voss
Conference paper
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 147)

Abstract

This interdisciplinary session, the first of its type in the 1980’s, is devoted to an analysis of organ recovery techniques from the frozen state using electromagnetic energy. The topics considered in the session are: the dielectric and thermal properties of tissues and their cryoprotectants, the frequency and the design of applicators (illuminators), and their essential control systems. The session has two objectives: to review the state of the art and to plan for the future cooperative inter-disciplinary attack on organ thawing. The medical success of real-time organ transplant in the 1980’s demands that we accept the storage challenge. We now have adequte electronic instrumentation to tackle the problem. The control systems required are available and a significant data base of ideas and methods exists. The importance of developing thawing techniques is very apparent: the effectiveness of organ freezing can only be analysed when viable thawing has also been achieved.

Keywords

Freeze State Organ Preservation Microwave Cavity Electromagnetic Field Distribution Renal Cortical Slice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • W. A. G. Voss
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Electrical EngineeringThe University of AlbertaEdmontonCanada

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