Advertisement

Shell-Core Particles for Turbidimetric Immunoassays

  • William J. Litchfield

Abstract

In 1980, we began to research and develop a number of homogeneous immunoassays for the Du Pont aca® discrete clinical analyzer. In doing so, we desired a technology that could provide rapid and accurate results, be easily automated on commercial equipment, and be sufficiently versatile to use with many different analytes of clinical importance. After evaluating a variety of immunoassay technologies, we selected latex agglutination which was measured turbidimetrically and which used novel shell-core particles synthesized by emulsion polymerization. These submicron particles contained cores of high refractive index polymers and were optimized in their size distribution to give maximal signal upon agglutination. They were coated with thin chemically reactive shells that could covalently bind antigens or antibodies and that were necessary for long term stability.

Keywords

Human Serum Albumin Emulsion Polymerization Core Particle Glycidyl Methacrylate Coated Particle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Babcock, D. A., Berger, J., Dautlick, J. X., et al. (1983) The Du Pont aca® III discrete clinical analyzer. In Laboratory medicine, G. J. Race, Ed., Harper & Row, Philadelphia, pp. 1–34.Google Scholar
  2. Cook, C. E., Twine, M. E., Myers, M. et al. (1976) Theophylline radioimmunoassay: Synthesis of antigen and characterization of antiserum. Res. Commun. Chem. Pathol. Pharamacol. 13, 497–505.Google Scholar
  3. Litchfield, W. J., Craig, A. R., Frey, W. A., Leflar, C. C., Looney, C. E., and Luddy, M. A. (1984) Novel shell/core particles for automated turbidimetric immunoassays. Clinical Chemistry 30, 1489–1493.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Looney, C. E. (1984) High-sensitivity light scattering immunoassays. J. Clinical Immunoassay 7, 90–95.Google Scholar
  5. Singer, J. M. and Plotz, C. M. (1956) The latex fixation test, 1. Application to the sérologic diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis. Am. J. Med. 21, 888–892.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • William J. Litchfield
    • 1
  1. 1.E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Company, Inc., Biomedical Products DepartmentGlasgow Research LaboratoryWilmingtonUSA

Personalised recommendations