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A Pharmacokinetic Equation Guide for Clinicians

  • Joyce Mordenti
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 145)

Abstract

Pharmacokinetic monitoring plays an important role in routine patient care. With the advent of rapid and specific drug assays, the clinician can obtain results quickly and, when nesessary, modify the dosage regimen. This chapter presents guidelines for determining drug disposition parameters in adult patients based on their dosing history and their plasma drug concentrations. This information is used in conjunction with the patient’s clinical response to therapy—such as a decrease in the number of seizures, cessation of arrhythmias, improvement in respiratory status, increased clotting time, or suspected toxicity--to design optimal dosage regimens. A list of the commonly monitored drugs appears in Table 1.

Keywords

Therapeutic Drug Monitoring Dose Interval Total Body Weight Plasma Protein Concentration Drug Input 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joyce Mordenti
    • 1
  1. 1.School of PharmacyUniversity of CaliforniaSan FranciscoUSA

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