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Human Genetic Individuality and Risk Assessment

  • A. G. Motulsky
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 43)

Abstract

The decline of infectious diseases and malnourishment in the Western world has made for greater attention to birth defects, genetic diseases, cancer, and various chronic diseases of later life. Good evidence exists for the involvement of various environmental agents in the etiology of many of these diseases. However, the exact contribution of environmental insults to the total health burden is poorly understood. The public is informed about ever more environmental or dietary substances which are said to cause cancer, birth defects, or other maladies and many people are alarmed about the possibility of deteriorating health condition in our society.

Keywords

G6PD Deficiency Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Atom Bomb Survivor Enzyme Variation Human Genetic Variation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Motulsky, A. G., 1982, Interspecies and human genetic variation, problems of risk assessment in chemical mutagenesis and carcinogenesis, in “Chemical Mutagenesis, Human Population Monitoring and Genetic Risk Assessment,” (Progress in Mutation Research, Vol. 3), K. C. Bora, G. R. Douglas, E. R. Nestmann, eds., Elsevier Biomedical Press.Google Scholar
  2. Motulsky, A. G., 1984, Environmental mutagenesis and disease in human populations, in “Mutation, Cancer, and Malformation,” E. H. Y. Chu, W. M. Generoso, eds., Plenum, New York.Google Scholar
  3. Motulsky, A. G., 1987, Human genetic variation and nutrition, Am. J. Clin. Nutr., 45:1108.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. G. Motulsky
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Medicine and Genetics and Center for Inherited DiseasesUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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