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Eicosanoid Changes in Skin Following Ultraviolet Light Irradiation

  • V. A. Ziboh
  • B. Burrall

Abstract

The incubation of homogenates prepared from UVB-irradiated guinea pig epidermis (24–72 hr) with [14C]-arachidonic acid ([14C]-AA) resulted in decreased transformation of [14C]-AA into the cyclooxygenase products (PGD2, PGE2, and PGF while the incorporation of 14C into lipoxygenase products (15-HETE and 12-HETE) increased. Investigation into the selective inhibition of the cyclooxygenase pathway revealed that the in vitro transformation of [14C]-AA into [14C]-cyclooxygenase products by the 105,000 x g particulate fraction prepared from normal unirradiated guinea pig epidermis was inhibited by the 105,000 x g cytoplasmic extract prepared from a 24-hr postirradiation guinea pig epidermis. These latter data imply (a) that an endogenous inhibitor(s) of the cyclooxygenase pathway is generated and released into the cytoplasm during UVB irradiation and (b) that it is likely that this selective inhibition of the cyclooxygenase pathway may contribute at least in part to the increased lipoxygenase products in the 24-hr postirradiation skin specimens and possibly the recognized prolonged UVB-induced inflammatory process.

Keywords

Lipoxygenase Product Cyclooxygenase Pathway Free Arachidonic Acid Cyclooxygenase Product Dihydroxyeicosatetraenoic Acid 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. A. Ziboh
    • 1
  • B. Burrall
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of DermatologyUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA

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