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Compatibility and Practical Properties of Polymer Blends

  • Rudolph D. Deanin

Abstract

The rubber, coatings, adhesives, and thermoset plastics industries have a long history of blending polymers to optimize the balance of properties for specific applications (1–3). The thermoplastics industry approached the concept much more cautiously and pessimistically over the past four decades. The need for improved balance of properties,and the potential ability of polymer blends to satisfy this need, converged in the successful commercial development of high-impact polystyrene, ABS, rigid polyvinyl chloride, high-impact polypropylene, modified polyphenylene oxide, and four families of thermoplastic elastomers, during the 1940’s to the 1960’s. More recently, with growing activity in theoretical analysis and practical applications, polymer blending has become a major area for vigorous growth in the past several years (4–9). Properties of plastics which have most often been improved by polymer blending include processability, strength, ductility, impact strength, tack/lubricity, abrasion resistance, heat deflection temperature, low-temperature impact/flexibility, flame retardance, permeability, environmental stress-crack resistance, UV/biodegradability, and price.

Keywords

Tensile Strength Impact Strength Polymer Blend Thermoplastic Elastomer Antimony Oxide 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Rudolph D. Deanin
    • 1
  1. 1.Plastics Engineering DepartmentUniversity of LowellLowellUSA

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