Advertisement

High Performance Polymers

  • Raymond B. Seymour

Abstract

Mankind’s progress has already been dependent on the applications of high performance polymers. Those polymers, such as proteinaceous tendons, silk and sisal fibers, and wood are not usually classified as high performance engineering polymers, but these naturally occurring products have high tensile strengths and durability and continue to be essential for our survival (1).

Keywords

Terephthalic Acid Sisal Fiber Heat Distortion Temperature High Performance Polymer Condensation Polymer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    H. F. Mark, Chapter 1 in “High Performance Polymers: Their Origin and Development.” R. B. Seymour and G. S. Kirshenbaum,eds., Elsevier Science Publishing Company, New York, NY, 1986.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    H. F. Mark and G. S. Whitby, eds., “Collected Papers of W. H. Carothers”, Interscience Publishing Company, New York, NY, 1940.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    M. I. Kohan, editor, “Nylon Plastics”, Wiley Interscience, New York, NY, 1973.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    V. V. Korshak and S. V. Vinogradova, “Polyesters”, Pergamon Press, New York, NY, 1965.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    R. O. Carhard, Chapter 3 in “Engineering Thermoplastics: Properties and Applications”, Marcel Dekker, Inc., New York, NY, 1985.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    A. Bettleheim Plast Technol 31 20, 22 (1985).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    R. B. Seymour, “Polymers for Engineering Applications” American Society for Metals, Metals Park, OH, 1987.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    A. L. Hay, Chapter 21 in “High Performance Polymers: Their Origin and Development”, R. B. Seymour and G. S. Kirshenbaum, editors, Elsevier Science Press, New York, NY, 1986.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    J. Frados, Plastic Focus 16 (49) 1, 2 (1985).Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    E. Helmes, et al, “Chemical Economics Handbook”, SRI International, Menlo Park, CA 1984.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    M. T. Bogert and R. R. Renshaw, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 30 1140 (1908)Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    J. J. King and B. H. Lee, Chapter 19 in “High Performance Polymers: Their Origin and Development”, R. B. Seymour, G. S. Kirshenbaum, editors, Elsevier Science Press, New York, NY, 1986.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Raymond B. Seymour
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Polymer ScienceUniversity of Southern MississippiHattiesburgUSA

Personalised recommendations