Hippuric Acid as a Marker

  • R. Vanholder
  • A. Schoots
  • C. Cramers
  • R. De Smet
  • N. Van Landschoot
  • V. Wizemann
  • J. Botella
  • S. Ringoir
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 223)

Abstract

There are some classical markers of uremic solute retention, such as serum urea and creatinine concentration. These parameters are however not always reliable, especially not in dialysis patients, so that it seemed interesting to us to undertake a multifactorial study, in an attempt to define the most suitable marker molecules in uremia. For this purpose, we used high performance liquid chromatography HPLC as a basic technique.

Keywords

Toxicity HPLC Urea Creatinine Toluene 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Vanholder
    • 1
  • A. Schoots
    • 2
  • C. Cramers
    • 2
  • R. De Smet
    • 1
  • N. Van Landschoot
    • 1
  • V. Wizemann
    • 3
  • J. Botella
    • 3
  • S. Ringoir
    • 4
  1. 1.Nephrology DepartmentUniversity HospitalGhentBelgium
  2. 2.Laboratory of Instrumental AnalysisUniversity of TechnologyEindhovenThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Centre of Internal MedicineJustus Liebig UniversityGiessenGermany
  4. 4.Nephrology DepartmentFree UniversityMadridSpain

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