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Uremic Toxins pp 287-290 | Cite as

Carnitine Depletion During Chronic Hemodialysis: Effect of Substitution on Free Carnitine Plasma Levels

  • P. E. Broquet
  • C. Von Moos
  • J. Frei
  • C. Gobelet
  • J. P. Wauters
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 223)

Abstract

Carnitine plays a role in the oxidative metabolism of free fatty-acids by transporting long chain fatty acids into the mitochondrial matrix (1). During chronic hemodialysis, a depletion of plasma carnitine levels has been observed and attributed to dialysis of this unbound low-molecular weight substance (M.W. 161) (2, 3). Due to the high efficiency of the presently used dialyzers, this may lead to long term carnitine depletion in the vascular and muscular compartments. Moreover, it appears that the synthesis of carnitine is altered in dialysis patients (4). Since some of the complications seen during chronic hemodialysis have been attributed to a depletion in carnitine, substitution by carnitine i.v. or in the dialysate has been logically applied. It appears however that a mixture of D, L-carnitine can lead to a myasthenia like syndrome due to the presence of D-carnitine (5). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the evolution of free carnitine plasma levels in a population of chronic hemodialysis patients before, during and after substitution with L-carnitine i.v. during 8 weeks.

Keywords

Dialysis Patient Chronic Hemodialysis Dialysis Session Chronic Hemodialysis Patient Serum Carnitine 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. E. Broquet
    • 1
  • C. Von Moos
    • 2
  • J. Frei
    • 2
  • C. Gobelet
    • 3
  • J. P. Wauters
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of NephrologyUniversity HospitalLausanneSwitzerland
  2. 2.Laboratory of Clinical ChemistryUniversity HospitalLausanneSwitzerland
  3. 3.Service of OrthopedyUniversity HospitalLausanneSwitzerland

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