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Middle Molecules as a Marker of Uremic Toxins

  • Zhao-Guang Wu
  • Lu-Tan Liao
  • Zhu-Hui Cai
  • Zhao-Nian Lu
  • You-De Cai
  • Pei-Fang Sheng
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 223)

Abstract

In the past decade, toxic uremic solutes in the molecular range of 350–5000 daltons, so called middle molecules (mm), have received much attention, particularly with regard to determination of their chemical structure and biologic toxicity (1–5). Even though substantial proof is still incomplete, uremic toxins with mm have been increasingly identified. In recent years, several new mm compounds have been fractioned and isolated in increased amounts in uremic sera and have been found to be responsible for the clinical manifestations (6–8). The present study is to ascertain the value of quantitative analysis of mm in the evaluation of the efficacy of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis (CAPD), hemodialysis (HD), sequential ultrafiltration and diffusion dialysis (SUD), hemofiltration (HF), hemoperfusion (HP) and reused hollow fiber dialysers.

Keywords

ATPase Activity Erythrocyte Membrane Continuous Ambulatory Peritoneal Dialysis Uremic Patient Molecular Weight Range 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zhao-Guang Wu
    • 1
  • Lu-Tan Liao
    • 1
  • Zhu-Hui Cai
    • 1
  • Zhao-Nian Lu
    • 1
  • You-De Cai
    • 1
  • Pei-Fang Sheng
    • 1
  1. 1.Zhong Shan HospitalShanghai Med. Univ.ShanghaiChina

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