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Uremic Toxins pp 197-204 | Cite as

Amino Acid Composition of Uremic Middle and Low Molecular Weight Retention Products

  • Nadine Bazilinski
  • Mashouf Shaykh
  • Sarosh Ahmed
  • Theodore Musiala
  • Robert H. Williams
  • Ann Poulos
  • Alvin Dubin
  • George Dunea
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 223)

Abstract

In order to characterize the spectrum of small peptides retained in chronic renal failure, we carried out high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) of serum ultrafiltrates from patients with chronic renal failure (CRF), acute renal failure (ARF), and normal subjects. HPLC patterns in CRF resolved into more than twenty peaks; those in ARF contained fewer peaks and resembled that of normals. We carried out amino acid analysis of HPLC fractions after hydrolysis with 6N HCl of four patients with CRF, one patient with ARF, and one normal subject. Following hydrolysis each HPLC fraction yielded several amino acids. Glycine, leucine, serine, phosphoserine, glutamic acid, and phenylalanine were found in greatest frequency in the four CRF patients.

Keywords

Acute Renal Failure Chronic Renal Failure High Pressure Liquid Chromatography Uremic Toxin Chronic Renal Failure Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nadine Bazilinski
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mashouf Shaykh
    • 1
  • Sarosh Ahmed
    • 1
  • Theodore Musiala
    • 3
  • Robert H. Williams
    • 3
  • Ann Poulos
    • 3
  • Alvin Dubin
    • 3
  • George Dunea
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of NephrologyCook County Hospital and Hektoen Institute for Medical ResearchChicagoUSA
  2. 2.College of MedicineUniversity of Illinois at ChicagoChicagoUSA
  3. 3.Department of BiochemistryRush University and Hektoen Institute for Medical ResearchChicagoUSA

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