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Cell Anomalies Associated with Spaceflight Conditions

  • Gerald R. Taylor
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 225)

Abstract

In this paper is presented an abbreviated historical review of previous spaceflight studies which relate to an understanding of the infectious disease process in flight. The offensive components, that is the causative agents, have been extensively studied. Intercrew transfer of microorganisms, “simplification” of the autoflora, and contamination of the cabin’s internal environment are well understood. Considerably less well understood is the defensive component of the infectious process. For a variety of reasons, the study of inflight human immune dysfunction has been uncoordinated, fragmented, and sometimes contradictory. However, we have been able to assemble enough data to: (1) demonstrate that the human immune system is altered during spaceflight and (2) develop a plan whereby the nature, degree, and significance of immune dysfunction can be studied in a manner which could allow the mechanism(s) of action to be elucidated. This paper, which presents the historical background and the NASA objectives for future tests, does not discuss the possible mechanisms involved. This latter subject is presented by the paper entitled “Human Mononuclear Cell In Vitro Activation in Microgravity and Post-space Flight,” by Richard Meehan, also presented at this Conference. The two papers are intended as companions, both of which are required to complete the spaceflight human immune dysfunction story.

Keywords

Space Flight Ground Control National Aeronautic Phage Production Lysogenic Bacterium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerald R. Taylor
    • 1
  1. 1.Medical Sciences Space Station Office (SD12)NASA Lyndon B. Johnson Space CenterHoustonUSA

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