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Analysis of T-Cell Receptor Gamma Chain Expression in the Thymus

  • D. M. Pardoll
  • A. M. Lew
  • W. L. Maloy
  • B. J. Fowlkes
  • A. Kruisbeek
  • J. A. Bluestone
  • R. H. Schwartz
  • J. E. Coligan
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 225)

Summary

While much is known about the structure and function of the T-cell receptor (TCR) αβ heterodimer, information has just begun to emerge about the γ protein, the product of a third rearranging T-cell receptor gene. We describe the use of antiserum to a carboxy-terminal peptide common to several of the murine gamma chain constant regions and a monoclonal antibody to the murine T3 complex to identify products of this T-cell receptor gene family in a subpopulation of Lyt2, L3T4 thymocytes. The gamma chain has a molecular weight of 35kD, is disulfide bonded to a 45kD partner termed delta (δ) and is associated with the T3 complex. The cells that bear this second T-cell receptor appear to represent a distinct lineage differentiating within the thymus.

Keywords

Nonreducing Condition Irrelevant Peptide Fetal Thymocyte Surface Radio Digitonin Lysate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. M. Pardoll
    • 1
  • A. M. Lew
    • 2
  • W. L. Maloy
    • 2
  • B. J. Fowlkes
    • 3
  • A. Kruisbeek
    • 5
  • J. A. Bluestone
    • 4
  • R. H. Schwartz
    • 1
  • J. E. Coligan
    • 2
  1. 1.Laboratory of ImmunologyNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  2. 2.Laboratory of ImmunogeneticsNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  3. 3.Laboratory of Microbial Immunity, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious DiseasesNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  4. 4.Transplantation Biology Section, Immunology BranchNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA
  5. 5.Biological Response Modifiers Section, National Cancer InstituteNational Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA

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