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Animal Models for Anxiety Disorders

  • William T. McKinney

Abstract

Anxiety disorders, including panic attacks, are ancient disorders which had been well described prior to DSM-III and more recent writers. As part of the rediscovery of this set of disorders, we are in the process of emphasizing their neurobiological aspects and discovering newer ways of treating them with psychopharmacological and/or behavioral means. Studies of the developmental and social origins of anxiety disorders have, unfortunately, become a lower priority item.

Keywords

Conditioned Stimulus Anxiety Disorder Unconditioned Stimulus Locus Coeruleus Passive Avoidance 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • William T. McKinney
    • 1
  1. 1.University of Wisconsin Medical SchoolMadisonUSA

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