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Learning in Infancy

A Mechanism for Behavioral Change during Development
  • Ingrid B. Johanson
  • Leslie M. Terry
Part of the Handbook of Behavioral Neurobiology book series (HBNE, volume 9)

Abstract

Several decades ago, the prevailing view of how learning and memory mechanisms might develop was based on the idea that altricial neonates are simply incompletely formed adults. Infant learning tasks were designed with the adult in mind, and performance differences between infants and adults were considered proof of the immature learning and performance capacities of infants. These immature capacities were attributed, in turn, to an immature nervous system (e.g., Cornwell and Fuller, 1961; Fuller, Easler, and Banks, 1950).

Keywords

Main Olfactory Bulb Ingestive Behavior Accessory Olfactory Bulb Olfactory Bulbectomy Developmental Psychobiology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ingrid B. Johanson
    • 1
  • Leslie M. Terry
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyFlorida Atlantic UniversityBoca RatonUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyDuke UniversityDurhamUSA

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