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Interactions between the Modulator Adenosine and Classical Transmitters

  • Bertil B. Fredholm
  • Christer Nordstedt
  • Ingeborg van der Ploeg
  • Eva Lindgren
  • Janet Ng
  • Mikael Jondal
Part of the Wenner-Gren Center International Symposium Series book series (WGCISS)

Abstract

There is continuous formation of adenosine in all cells. Methyltransferase reactions lead to the formation of S-adenosylhomocysteine, which is rapidly broken down to form adenosine. The rate of adenosine formation is markedly enhanced by any procedure that leads to a dissociation between the rate of ATP-production and the rate of ATP-utilization. Thus, adenosine levels rapidly increase in tissues whenever there is a threatening depletion of high-energy phosphate compounds from any of the cells in the tissue. Adenosine may be thought of as a signal of the metabolic state of a tissue or a group of cells.

Keywords

Jurkat Cell Adenosine Receptor Phorbol Ester Pertussis Toxin Inositol Trisphosphate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© The Wenner-Gren Center 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bertil B. Fredholm
  • Christer Nordstedt
  • Ingeborg van der Ploeg
  • Eva Lindgren
  • Janet Ng
  • Mikael Jondal

There are no affiliations available

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