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Coordinated Receptor Regulation in Ovarian Granulosa Cells

  • T. T. Chen
  • K. Gao
  • M. A. Shelton
  • D. D. Hatmaker
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 219)

Abstract

The concept of receptor down regulation by its own hormone through internalization of the hormone-receptor complex is well established (for reviews, see Blecher and Bar, 1981; Kaplan, 1981). However, the cellular basis for heterologous receptor regulation is less well defined. The process is important in endocrine cells, particularly in the ovarian cell, because granulosa and luteal cells are under the control of at least a dozen different hormones and growth factors (Hseuh et al., 1984). To further complicate matters, any one of these agents may positively or negatively regulate receptors for other hormones. For example, physiologic levels of LH increase prolactin (Prl) receptor number, while pharmacologic levels of LH induce a transient decrease of Prl receptors (Chen et al., 1979). Likewise, physiologic levels of Prl result in an increase of LH receptors in these cell types (Richards, 1979), but the effect of high levels of Prl on LH receptor has not been well studied.

Keywords

Granulosa Cell Luteal Cell Ovarian Granulosa Cell Granulosa Cell Culture Steroidogenic Response 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. T. Chen
    • 1
  • K. Gao
    • 1
  • M. A. Shelton
    • 1
  • D. D. Hatmaker
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of ZoologyUniversity of TennesseeKnoxvilleUSA

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