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A Method for Treatment of Data from the Instream Flow Incremental Methodology for Instream Flow Determination

  • William H. Geer

Abstract

The alteration of streamflow regimes is a major cause of degradation of western U.S. trout streams, and several instream flow needs methodologies have been developed to determine both the impacts of streamflow alteration and the streamflow regimes necessary for fishery protection. Perhaps the most widely used is the Instream Flow Incremental Methodology (IFIM) of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Bovee 1982). The field application of the IFIM is described in Bovee and Milhous (1978), and the hydraulic and habitat modeling are discussed in Milhous, Wegner, and Waddle (1981). But, while IFIM users can collect field data and simulate hydraulic and habitat parameters by standardized procedures, the final analysis of habitat simulation data is not standardized or well described. Simulation output frequently is an enormous mass of refined data subject to divergent interpretation by different fishery analysts.

Keywords

Life Stage Brown Trout Flood Flow Instream Flow Target Taxon 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Bovee, K. D. 1978. Probability-of-use criteria for the family Salmonidae. Instream Flow Information Paper No. 4. Cooperative Instream Flow Service Group, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Fort Collins, CO.Google Scholar
  2. Bovee, K. D. 1982. A guide to stream habitat analysis using the instream flow incremental methodology. Instream Flow Information Paper No. 12. Cooperative Instream Flow Service Group, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Fort Collins, CO.Google Scholar
  3. Bovee, K. D. & Milhous, R. 1978. Hydraulic simulation in instream flow studies: theory and techniques. Instream Flow Information Paper No. 5. Cooperative Instream Flow Service Group, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Fort Collins, CO.Google Scholar
  4. Milhous, R., Wegner, D. L. & Waddle, T. 1981. User’s guide to the physical habitat simulation system. Instream Flow Information Paper No. 11. Cooperative Instream Flow Service Group, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Fort Collins, CO.Google Scholar
  5. Searcy, J. K. 1969. Manual of hydrology. Part 2: Low flow techniques — flow duration curves. Water Supply Paper No. 1542-A. U.S. GeologicalGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • William H. Geer
    • 1
  1. 1.Utah Division of Wildlife ResourcesSalt Lake CityUSA

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