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Properties and Uses of Heat Shock Promoters

  • Hugh Pelham
Part of the Genetic Engineering book series (GEPM)

Abstract

Heat shock genes are transcriptionally activated when cells are exposed to elevated temperature, or to a number of other damaging conditions. Although such genes were originally discovered and studied in Drosophila, it is now clear that the response is an ancient and highly conserved one, found in all organisms (1–7). Heat shock proteins (hsps) are thought to protect cells from damage in certain stressful conditions, but the precise ways in which they do this remain somewhat unclear. All of the major heat shock genes have been cloned from Drosophila, and some of those from a variety of other species, including humans, Xenopus, nematodes, maize, soybean, yeast, and E. coli (1–7, see Figure 1). All species examined have a protein of about 70 kD (hsp70), one about 80 to 90 kD (hsp83 in Drosophila), and usually several related small hsps (hsp22, hsp23, hsp26 and hsp27 in Drosophila).

Keywords

Heat Shock Heat Shock Response Heat Shock Transcription Factor Heat Shock Gene Drosophila Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hugh Pelham
    • 1
  1. 1.MRC Laboratory of Molecular BiologyCambridgeEngland

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