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Abstract

No physical disorder is more misunderstood by behavioral scientists than is asthma. Many seem to believe it is a psychological affliction that, like a water faucet, can be turned on and off at will by the patient. This myth survives in the face of reality. Others believe asthma can be cured by psychotherapy. This myth also persists despite a total absence of supporting evidence. Asthma is a complex respiratory condition; not only can a multitude of stimuli precipitate attacks, but an endless number of events, many of which have yet to be delineated, influence the course both of individual attacks and of asthma per se. This makes predicting the future direction of a given patient’s asthma about as precise as forecasting his behavior. The eloquent models that once promised to permit us to formulate and predict behavior within a simple set of principles have disintegrated in the past two decades. William Estes was recently quoted as saying that what once was regarded with “high optimism” has since been replaced by “strong disillusionment” (Fox, 1983).

Keywords

Peak Flow Chronic Bronchitis Asthmatic Child Clinical Immunology Peak Expiratory Flow Rate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas L. Creer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyOhio UniversityAthensUSA

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