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Biological Barriers in the Treatment of Alcoholism

  • David M. Lawson
  • Michelle Craske
Part of the The Plenum Series in Behavioral Psychophysiology book series (SSBP)

Abstract

For more than 20 years, a controversy has raged between the proponents of two conflicting models of alcoholism. One model, typically referred to as the traditional or disease model (Pattison, Sobell, & Sobell, 1977) assumes that alcoholism is a progressive, irreversible disease which may cause the abstaining alcoholic to experience an irresistible craving for alcohol and the indulgent alcoholic to lose control over alcohol consumption. The etiology of alcoholism, according to this model, is physiological and/or genetic in origin. In contrast, the behavioral model assumes that alcohol consumption is a socially acquired, learned pattern of behavior which occurs as a function of antecedent and consequent events. Such events include situational or environmental factors as well as the alcoholic’s cognitive and affective states.

Keywords

Alcohol Consumption Conditioned Stimulus Conditioned Response Neuropsychological Deficit Unconditioned Response 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • David M. Lawson
    • 1
  • Michelle Craske
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyShaughnessy HospitalVancouverCanada
  2. 2.Center for Stress and Anxiety DisordersState University of New York at AlbanyAlbanyUSA

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