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Pain

  • Ruth V. E. Grunau
  • Kenneth D. Craig
Part of the The Plenum Series in Behavioral Psychophysiology book series (SSBP)

Abstract

Pain is a complex experience central to human existence. The burden it places on individuals and society is of enormous cost. Accidental injury, disease, and physical trauma inflicted during acts of aggression are virtually universal events. Of particular importance is chronic pain, which imposes economic, social, and emotional hardships on patients, their families, and society, and is a major source of disability in North America today (Bonica, 1983). Our ability to prevent and treat pain in its many manifestations has been limited by our conceptual models and theories; yet these have been surprisingly transitory.

Keywords

Chronic Pain Dorsal Horn Labor Pain Tension Headache Pain Research 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ruth V. E. Grunau
    • 1
  • Kenneth D. Craig
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada

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