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Development of an AI-Based Optimization System for Tandem Mass Spectrometry

  • Carla M. Wong
  • Hal R. Brand
Part of the Modern Analytical Chemistry book series (MOAC)

Abstract

Artificial intelligence (AI) is that branch of computer science that attempts to understand and model intelligent behavior with the aid of computers. In general these attempts to have machines emulate intelligent behavior fall far short of the competence of humans. However, in the area of expert systems, computer programs have been developed that can achieve human performance, and in limited aspects even exceed it.

Keywords

Expert System Triple Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer Collisionally Activate Dissociation Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Field Axis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Carla M. Wong
    • 1
  • Hal R. Brand
    • 1
  1. 1.Lawrence Livermore National LaboratoryChemistry and Materials Science DepartmentLivermoreUSA

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