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Abstract

The onset of labor and its culmination in delivery clearly mark the moment of transition to parenthood. The birth of a child transforms the internal and external realities of the mother as well as relationships within and between families and generations. Labor and delivery, because they constitute the moment of the transformation, are imbued with undeniable drama and importance. However, childbirth can also be viewed as a point along a continuum which begins before conception and moves through pregnancy, labor, delivery, the confinement period immediately following the birth, and the beginnings of the developing relationship with the child. As the pregnant woman advances through these phases, we see a continually changing pattern of relationships with the fetus growing inside her, with her mate, with her own parents, and with the environment.

Keywords

Pregnant Woman Male Partner Physical Sensation Birth Process External Reality 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Naomi Berne
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Alcott Montessori SchoolScarsdaleUSA
  2. 2.Pleasantville Cottage SchoolPleasantvilleUSA

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