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Psychoanalytic Aspects of Pregnancy

  • Roni O. Cohen

Abstract

Among the psychophysiological crises in a women’s life, pregnancy holds a unique position. Like menarche and menopause, it is a crisis because it revives unsettled psychological conflicts from previous stages and requires psychological adaptations to achieve a new integration. Like menarche and menopause, it represents a developmental step in relationship to the self (as well as here in relationship to the mate and child). And like menarche and menopause, pregnancy sets off an acute disequilibrium endocrinologically, somatically, and psychologically (Bibring, 1959).

Keywords

Standard Edition Oedipus Complex Love Object Psychoanalytic Study Oedipal Conflict 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roni O. Cohen
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryCornell Medical CenterUSA
  2. 2.Payne Whitney ClinicUSA
  3. 3.The Psychoanalytic Society of the Postdoctoral ProgramUSA

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