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Menarche and Menstruation

Psychoanalytic Implications
  • Sue A. Shapiro

Abstract

Menarche, as a rite of passage, and menstruation, as an ongoing fact of a woman’s life, are central to women’s experience. The entry into and exit from reproductive capability seem clearly evident to most women. Until reliable birth control became available in the last century, the menstrual cycle governed women’s lives. The phenomenology of the menstrual cycle deserves the attention of psychoanalysts, because of both its presence during 30 to 40 years of women’s lives, and the possible clues it offers in understanding the complex interplay of psyche and soma in the generation of psychological experience.

Keywords

Luteinizing Hormone Menstrual Cycle Adolescent Girl Borderline Personality Disorder Premenstrual Syndrome 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sue A. Shapiro
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Doctoral Program in Clinical PsychologyNew York UniversityUSA
  2. 2.New York University Medical SchoolUSA
  3. 3.Faculty, Manhattan Institute for PsychoanalysisUSA

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