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Abstract

This chapter charts societal attitudes toward the menopause, highlights the differences between pejorative medical views and the views of women experiencing menopause, and surveys sociocultural influences and the effects of life stress on menopausal symptoms. The sparse research on menopausal symptoms is reviewed, subjective reactions to such symptoms (e.g., hot flashes) are explored and a plea is made for the collection of more information. We begin with definitions.

Keywords

Menopausal Woman Menopausal Symptom Male Physician Climacteric Syndrome Final Menstrual Period 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ruth Formanek
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Hofstra UniversityHempsteadUSA
  2. 2.Jewish Community ServicesLong IslandUSA

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