A Study of Menopausal Women in Analytic Treatment

  • Dale Mendell

Abstract

There has been a considerable dearth of psychoanalytic literature on menopause. At first glance this is surprising, since menopause is an inescapable fact in the life history of women, a psychophysical passage replete with layers of multiple meanings. As such, it would appear to be a treasure trove for psychoanalytic investigation of the vicissitudes of development and of the interaction between a biological event and its numerous diverse psychic manifestations.

Keywords

Depression Estrogen Defend Decid Lost 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dale Mendell
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.The Psychoanalytic InstitutePostgraduate Center for Mental HealthNew York CityUSA
  2. 2.Training Institute for Mental HealthUSA
  3. 3.National Institute for the PsychotherapiesUSA

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