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Occupational Medicine

  • Mark R. Cullen

Abstract

Although the evidence that chemical, physical, and biological factors at work play significant roles in the causation of medical disease has been recognized for over 285 years,1 clinical attention to this area by all but a handful of industrial physicians has been minimal. Nonetheless, it is estimated that as many as half a million working people in the United States will acquire a work-related illness every year, many disabling and not a few lethal.2 Furthermore, these illnesses will not be limited to a small number of unusual or high-risk workers like coal miners or lead smelters; virtually all occupations and work processes have attendant risks. Since the majority of adults—including women—now work outside the home,3 the problems of recognition, treatment, and prevention of occupational disease will arise in virtually every type of medical practice.

Keywords

Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Vinyl Chloride Occupational Medicine Occupational Disease Occupational History 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Annotated Bibliography

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    Clayton, G. D., and Clayton, F. E. (eds.): Patty’s Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology, 3rd rev. ed., Vols. I, IIA, IIB, IIC, IIIA, IIIB. Wiley, New York, 1981. This reference is a must for those in the field, the “Goodman and Gilman” of toxicology. Virtually any chemical can be conveniently researched here—a reasonably current review of the literature is provided, though clinical issues are not emphasized.Google Scholar
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    Finkel, A. J. (ed.): Hamilton and Hardy’s Industrial Toxicology, 4th ed. John Wright PSG, Boston, 1983. This is the “classic” text written by the great women of occupational medicine who saw it all, updated. Fabulous anecdotal clinical data.Google Scholar
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    Rom, W. N. (ed.): Environmental and Occupational Medicine. Little, Brown, Boston, 1983. A relatively new, complete, and balanced general text of occupational medicine; clinical issues receive variable detail.Google Scholar
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    Rosenstock, L., and Cullen, M. R.: Clinical Occupational Medicine. Saunders, Philadelphia, 1986. A new, inexpensive text exclusively oriented to practical issues in clinical management, presented in a “Washington manual” type format for easy reference; an extended version of this chapter.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mark R. Cullen
    • 1
  1. 1.Occupational Medicine ProgramYale University School of MedicineNew HavenUSA

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