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Osteoporosis

  • Eric Reiss

Abstract

Osteoporosis represents a decrease of bone mass that equally affects all elements of bone: the bone mass is small but normal in composition. Specifically, the proportion of organic and inorganic phases is normal, there are no defects in calcification, and the cellular architecture is not grossly distorted. This distinguishes osteoporosis from metabolic bone diseases that superficially resemble it, such as osteomalacia and osteitis fibrosa.

Keywords

Bone Mass Bone Mineral Content Osteogenesis Imperfecta Estrogen Replacement Therapy Postmenopausal Bone Loss 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Eric Reiss
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of MedicineUniversity of Miami School of MedicineMiamiUSA

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