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Molecular Basis of Rhabdovirus Replication

  • Suzanne U. Emerson
  • Manfred Schubert
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 136)

Abstract

A virus was originally classified as a rhabdovirus if it displayed a distinctive elongated morphology (1). Rhabdo means rod-like and all rhabdoviruses have a bacilliform or conical appearance. Over 60 different viruses currently comprise the rhabdovirus group and some members are listed in Table 1 (2). Many of these viruses are transmitted to their plant or vertebrate hosts by insects and, therefore, must be able to successfully infect and replicate in both invertebrate and vertebrate or invertebrate and plant cells. However, transmission by an arthropod vector is not a mandatory requirement for classification as a rhabdovirus since rabies virus is most commonly spread by direct animal contact via the bite of an infected vertebrate. Many viruses in the rhabdovirus group are of interest because as pathogens of livestock (vesicular stomatitis), fish (spring viremia of carp), or plants (lettuce necrotic yellows), they have a significant economic impact. Others, such as rabies virus are feared because they are virulent human pathogens. In humans (and most animals), once a rabies virus infection is established and symptoms appear, there is no effective treatment and death invariably follows due to destruction of the central nervous system. Aside from the obvious importance of rhabdoviruses as pathogens, certain members of the group have generated considerable interest as models for viral replication, glycoprotein biosynthesis, and membrane structure. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) has been particularly useful in this regard because it can be easily propagated to high titers in tissue culture.

Keywords

Rabies Virus Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Nucleocapsid Protein Parental Virus Polymerase Complex 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Suzanne U. Emerson
    • 1
    • 2
  • Manfred Schubert
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.University of VirginiaCharlottesvilleUSA
  2. 2.National Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA

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