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Flow Cytometry: A New Approach to the Isolation and Characterization of Kupffer Cells

  • J. N. Udall
  • R. A. Moscicki
  • F. I. Preffer
  • P. D. Ariniello
  • E. A. Carter
  • A. K. Bhan
  • K. J. Bloch
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 216 A)

Abstract

Kupffer cells clear portal blood of absorbed proteases, endotoxins and other noxious substances. These cells are well positioned to do so, they reside in the sinusoids of the liver and lie on the luminal side of the sinusoidal endothelium with cytoplasmic processes which insert focally between endothelial cells. Numerically, Kupffer cells comprise approximately 10% of all liver cells (1). Despite their relative abundance, it has been difficult to obtain pure suspensions of Kupffer cells. Cell suspensions containing 40–85% Kupffer cells have been obtained by treating the rat liver in situ with collagenase and subjecting the resulting cell suspension to centrifugal elutriation.

Keywords

Kupffer Cell Result Cell Suspension Centrifugal Elutriation Sinusoidal Endothelium Peroxidase Staining 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. N. Udall
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • R. A. Moscicki
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • F. I. Preffer
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • P. D. Ariniello
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • E. A. Carter
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • A. K. Bhan
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • K. J. Bloch
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Departments of Pediatrics, Pathology and MedicineHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA
  2. 2.Combined Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition Units of Massachusetts General Hospital and Children’s HospitalBostonUSA
  3. 3.Immunopathology and Clinical Immunology and Allergy Units of Massachusetts General HospitalBostonUSA

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