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Intestinal Mucosal Mast Cells in Rats With Graft-Versus-Host Reaction

  • A. Ferguson
  • A. G. Cummins
  • G. H. Munro
  • S. Gibson
  • H. R. P. Miller
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 216 A)

Abstract

In clinical practice, small intestinal mucosal damage with villus atrophy and crypt hyperplasia (enteropathy), occurs in association with immune reactions to alloantigens, parasites and dietary proteins. A similar, distinct pattern of mucosal pathology has been recognized in delayed type hypersensitivity reactions in animals, including mice, rats, pigs and calves. Experimental models used include allograft rejection, graft-versus-host reaction (GvHR), enteral challenge after immunization with protein antigen or contact sensitizing agent, and parasite infections. The features described in some or all of these situations are hyperplasia of the crypts of Lieberkuhn with or without shortening of the villi; an increase in the proportion of goblet cells; brush border enzyme deficiency; increased count of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL); an increased mitotic index of IEL; and expression of la antigen on crypt enterocytes (1).

Keywords

Mast Cell Radial Immunodiffusion Mucosal Mast Cell Crypt Hyperplasia Type Hypersensitivity Reaction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Ferguson
    • 1
    • 2
  • A. G. Cummins
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. H. Munro
    • 1
    • 2
  • S. Gibson
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. R. P. Miller
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Gastrointestinal UnitUniversity of Edinburgh and Western General HospitalEdinburghUK
  2. 2.Moredun Research InstituteEdinburghScotland, UK

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