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In Vitro Effects of IgA on Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocytes

  • Y. Sibille
  • D. L. Delacroix
  • W. W. Merrill
  • B. Chatelain
  • J.-P. Vaerman
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 216 A)

Abstract

Receptors for immunoglobulin A (IgA) have been demonstrated on human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), monocytes and macrophages (1–3). However, little is known about the effector function of this Ig on human phagocytes. Recently, IgA was reported to have inhibitory effects on several effector functions of human PMN such as Chemotaxis towards various chemoattractants (4), bactericidal activity (5), phagocytosis (5) and formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP)-stimulated chemiluminescence (6). However, these effects contrast with the increase of PMN cytotoxicity by IgA and with the absence of influence of IgA on Zymosan-induced chemiluminescence or on capping of PMN with fluorescent concanavalin A (7).

Keywords

Human Serum Albumin Human Polymorphonuclear Leukocyte Ficoll Hypaque Density Gradient Centrifugation Chemotaxis Chamber High Power Microscopic Field 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. Sibille
    • 1
    • 2
  • D. L. Delacroix
    • 1
    • 2
  • W. W. Merrill
    • 1
    • 2
  • B. Chatelain
    • 1
    • 2
  • J.-P. Vaerman
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Experimental Medicine Unit (ICP) and University Hospital Mont-GodinneCatholic University of LouvainBelgium
  2. 2.Pulmonary Section, Medical SchoolYale UniversityNew HavenUSA

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