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Antibacterial Activity of Lymphocytes Armed with IgA

  • A. Tagliabue
  • L. Nencioni
  • M. Romano
  • L. Villa
  • M. T. De Magistris
  • D. Boraschi
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 216 A)

Abstract

It is thought that IgA play a major role against bacterial and viral infections, particularly at the mucosal level. However, the mechanisms through which IgA express their activity are still a matter of debate. After the discovery of Fc receptors for IgA (Fcα) in different cellular subpopulations from experimental animals and humans, it was suggested that IgA might also drive mechansims of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). To verify this hypothesis, we investigated whether murine lymphocytes from peripheral and gut associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) were capable of expressing IgA-ADCC against gram-negative bacterial targets. It was, in fact, observed that this activity can be expressed by cells from normal mice (1–5). Similar experiments were, therefore, performed employing human lymphocytes, and the results obtained demonstrated that IgA-ADCC also exists in humans (6–7). A summary of the results obtained so far is presented here, together with our most recent unpublished findings on this subject.

Keywords

Antibacterial Activity Cord Blood Normal Donor Oral Vaccine Mucosal Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Tagliabue
    • 1
  • L. Nencioni
    • 1
  • M. Romano
    • 1
  • L. Villa
    • 1
  • M. T. De Magistris
    • 1
  • D. Boraschi
    • 1
  1. 1.Sclavo Research CenterSienaItaly

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