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Ultrastructural Localization of IgA and IgG in Uterine Epithelial Cells Following Estradiol Administration

  • K. H. Templeman
  • C. R. Wira
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 216 A)

Abstract

The secretory immune system in the reproductive tract of the female mammal is acutely sensitive to stimulation by estradiol (1). Within three hours of each of three daily doses of estradiol to the ovariectomized rat, IgG enters the uterine lumen (2) concomitant with the fluid imbibition phase of estrogen stimulation of the uterus. The levels of IgA in the uterine lumen, on the other hand, do not rise significantly until 32–48 hours of estradiol stimulation (2,3). In order to characterize the morphologic nature of the process of immunoglobulin transport in this polarized epithelial system, we analyzed the distribution patterns of post-embedment immunogold labeling assays of IgA and IgG in uterine epithelial cells at various times of estradiol stimulation.

Keywords

Intermediate Filament Coated Vesicle Uterine Epithelial Cell Uterine Lumen Sodium Metaperiodate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. H. Templeman
    • 1
  • C. R. Wira
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyDartmouth Medical SchoolHanoverUSA

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