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Characterization of Lymphoid Cells from the Human Fallopian Tube Mucosa

  • M. D. Cooper
  • C. Dever
  • K. Tempel
  • E. J. Moticka
  • T. Hindman
  • D. S. Stephens
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 216 A)

Abstract

Much information about the immune response available at mucosal surfaces has been derived through studies on the gut mucosa of man and animals (1,2). By contrast, relatively little is known about the immunocompetent cells and their activity from other mucosal surfaces. Several studies (3–6) have demonstrated differences between mucosal immune responses in different organs. One organ for which relatively little data is available is the human fallopian tube. Early studies by Tourville et. al. (7) on the localization of immunoglobulin producing cells in the human fallopian tube demonstrated the presence of IgG and IgA, but not IgM secreting cells in the lamina propria (LP) and along the basement membrane (BM). Biological consequences of the immunoglobulins produced by these cells is still speculative. In addition, immunocompenent cells other than B cells in the fallopian tube have not been identified or characterized. In order to increase our understanding of the types of immune responses which might take place at this important host-parasite interface, we initiated studies to determine the cell types present in Neisseria infected and uninfected organ culture models of human fallopian tubes.

Keywords

Lamina Propria Lymphoid Cell Fallopian Tube Neisseria Gonorrhoeae Percoll Gradient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. D. Cooper
    • 1
    • 2
  • C. Dever
    • 1
    • 2
  • K. Tempel
    • 1
    • 2
  • E. J. Moticka
    • 1
    • 2
  • T. Hindman
    • 1
    • 2
  • D. S. Stephens
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Medical Microbiology, Immunology and PathologySouthern Illinois University School of MedicineSpringfieldUSA
  2. 2.Department of MedicineEmory UniversityAtlantaUSA

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