Canine Peyer’s Patches: Macroscopic, Light Microscopic, Scanning Electron Microscopic and Immunohistochemical Investigations

  • H. HogenEsch
  • J. M. Housman
  • P. J. Felsburg
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 216 A)

Abstract

In 1928, Carlens reported on his detailed investigations of the morphology and ontogeny of lymphoid tissue in the intestinal tract of large domestic animals (1). He observed that the morphology and development of the ileal Peyer’s patch (PP) was different from the PP in the rest of the small intestine. Recent studies in sheep (2), cattle (3) and swine (4) have confirmed and expanded Carlens’ observations. The ileal PP has been shown to be functionally different from the jejunal PP and may represent the bursa-equivalent in sheep and cattle (3,5). In contrast, morphologic studies in mice (6), rats (7) and humans (8) do not indicate the existence of these regional differences of PP.

Keywords

Formalin Migration Depression Hexagonal Germinal 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. HogenEsch
    • 1
  • J. M. Housman
    • 1
  • P. J. Felsburg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Veterinary PathobiologyUniversity of IllinoisUrbanaUSA

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