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Plant Vacuoles pp 301-304 | Cite as

Specific Uptake of the N-Oxides of Pyrrolizidine Alkaloids by Cells, Protoplasts and Vacuoles from Senecio Cell Cultures

  • Adelheid Ehmke
  • Kirsten Von Borstel
  • Thomas Hartmann
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 134)

Abstract

The pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) are secondary plant compounds which are found in several genera of the Asteraceae, Boraginaceae and Fabaceae. In plants they generally occur as mixtures of the tertiary alkaloids and the respective alkaloid N-oxides (Fig. 1). Recent studies in our laboratory with Senecio vulgaris (Asteraceae) revealed the PA-N-oxides not only to be dominating alkaloid form found in the various plant tissues (Hartmann and Zimmer, 1986), but also to be the primary products of PA biosynthesis in root cultures (Von Borstel and Hartmann, 1986).

Keywords

Cell Suspension Culture Root Culture Pyrrolizidine Alkaloid Secondary Plant Compound Flotation Centrifugation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adelheid Ehmke
    • 1
  • Kirsten Von Borstel
    • 1
  • Thomas Hartmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für Pharmazeutische BiologieTechnischen UniversitätBraunschweigGermany

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