Advertisement

Properties of Vacuoles as a Function of the Isolation Procedure

  • Hélène Barbier-Brygoo
  • Jean-Pierre Renaudin
  • Pierre Manigault
  • Yves Mathieu
  • Armen Kurkdjian
  • Jean Guern
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 134)

Abstract

A more and more detailed picture of the properties of vacuoles is emerging from the literature of the past few years. The vacuoles are major storage compartments for acid hydrolases, sucrose, organic acids such as malate and citrate, basic amino-acids and many different secondary metabolites. Aside this general and coherent picture, large discrepancies exist in the literature concerning the intensity of the electrochemical potential difference of protons (Δ\(\overline{\mu {{H}^{+}}}\)) across the tonoplast of isolated vacuoles. The electrical potential difference (Em) across the tonoplast of isolated vacuoles was reported to be negative when calculated from the equilibrium distribution of permeant lipophilic cations, whereas positive Em were measured with microelectrodes (for a review, see Leigh, 1983, and Gibrat et al., 1985 a). As to the transtonoplast pH gradient, the only agreement is on the fact that the vacuoles are acidic relative to the cytoplasm. But very few measurements of the transtonoplast ΔpH in cells or isolated vacuoles have been performed. Furthermore, reports of the dissipation of this pH gradient during the isolation of vacuoles and their subsequent manipulation (Schmitt and Sandermann, 1982; Matern et al., 1986) contrast with other results demonstrating the stability of the ΔpH.

Keywords

Rosmarinic Acid Electrical Potential Difference Catharanthus Roseus Acer Pseudoplatanus Lipophilic Cation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Barbier, H., and Guern, J., 1982, Transmembrane potential of isolated vacuoles and sucrose accumulation by Beta vulgaris roots, in: “Plasmalemma and Tonoplast: Their Function in the Plant Cell”, D. Marmé, E. Marré, and R. Hertel, eds., Elsevier Biomedical Press, Amsterdam.Google Scholar
  2. Barbier-Brygoo, H., Gibrat, R., Renaudin, J. P., Brown, S. C., Pradier, J. M., Grignon, C., and Guern, J., 1985, Membrane potential difference of isolated plant vacuoles: positive or negative ? II. Comparison of measurements with micro-electrodes and cationic probes, Biochim. Biophys. Acta, 819: 215.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Barbier-Brygoo, H., Romieu, C., Grouzis, J. P., Gibrat, R., Grignon, C., and Guern, J., 1984, Evidence for the contribution of surface potential to the transtonoplast potential difference measured on isolated vacuoles with micro-electrodes, Z. Pflanzenphysiol., 114: 215.Google Scholar
  4. Blumwald, E., and Poole, R. J., 1985, Na+/H+ antiport in isolated tonoplast vesicles from storage tissue of Beta vulgaris, Plant Physiol., 78: 163.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Brown, S. C., Renaudin, J. P., Prévot, C., and Guern, J., 1984, Flow cytometry and sorting of plant protoplasts: Technical problems and physiological results from a study of pH and alkaloids in Catharanthus roseus, Physiol. Vég., 22: 541.Google Scholar
  6. Chaprin, N., and Ellis, B. E., 1984, Microspectrophotometric evaluation of rosmarinic acid accumulation in single cultured plant cells, Can. J. Bot., 62: 2278.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Deus-Neumann, B., and Zenk, M. H., 1984, A highly selective alkaloid uptake system in vacuoles of higher plants, Planta, 162: 250.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Gibrat, R., Barbier-Brygoo, H., Guern, J., and Grignon, C., 1985 a, Transtonoplast potential difference and surface potential of isolated vacuoles, in: “Biochemistry and Function of Vacuolar ATPase in Fungi and Plants”, B. P. Marin, ed., Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New-York, Tokyo.Google Scholar
  9. Gibrat, R., Barbier-Brygoo, H., Guern, J., and Grignon, C., 1985 b, Membrane potential difference of isolated plant vacuoles: Positive and negative ? I. Evidence for membrane binding of cationic probes, Biochim. Biophys. Acta, 819: 206.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. John, P., and Miller, A. J., 1986, Electrogenic proton translocation by the adenosine triphosphatase of intact vacuoles isolated from beet ( Beta vulgaris L.), J. Plant Physiol., 122: 1.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Korzun, A. M., Salyev, R. K., and Kuzevanov, V. Ya., 1984, Peculiarities of electrophysiological investigations of the vacuolar membrane in cells of higher plants, Soviet. Plant Physiol., 31: 156.Google Scholar
  12. Kurkdjian, A. C., Barbier-Brygoo, H., Manigault, J., and Manigault, P., 1984, Distribution of vacuolar pH values within populations of cells, protoplasts and vacuoles isolated from suspension cultures and plant tissues, Physiol. Veg., 22: 193.Google Scholar
  13. Kurkdjian, A. C., Quiquampoix, H., Barbier-Brygoo, H., Péan, M., Manigault, P., and Guern, J., 1985, Critical evaluation of methods for estimating the vacuolar pH of plant cells, in: “Biochemistry and Function of Vacuolar Adenosine-triphosphatase in Fungi and Plants”, B. P. Marin, ed., Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New-York, Tokyo.Google Scholar
  14. Leigh, R., 1983, Methods, progress and potential for the use of isolated vacuoles in studies of solute transport in higher plant cells, Physiol. Plant., 57: 390.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Manigault, P., Manigault, J., and Kurkdjian, A. C., 1983, A microfluorimetric method for vacuolar pH measurement in plant cells using 9-aminoacridine, Physiol. Vég., 21: 129.Google Scholar
  16. Martin, J. B., Bligny, R., Rebeille, F., Douce, R., Leguay, J. J., Mathieu, Y., and Guern, J., 1982, A 31P nuclear magnetic resonance study of intracellular pH of plant cells cultivated in liquid medium, Plant Physiol., 70: 1156.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Matern, U., Reichenbach, C., and Heller, W., 1986, Efficient uptake of flavonoids into parsley ( Petroselinum hortense) vacuoles requires acylated glycosides, Planta, 167: 183.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Renaudin, J. P., Brown, S. C., Barbier-Brygoo, H., and Guern, J., 1986, Quantative characterization of protoplasts and vacuoles from suspension cultured cells of Catharanthus roseus, Physiol. Plant., in press.Google Scholar
  19. Renaudin, J. P., and Guern, J., 1986, Ajmalicine transport in vacuoles isolated from Catharanthus roseus cells, in: “Plant Vacuoles. Their Importance in Solute Compartmentation and Their Applications in Biotechnology”, B. Marin, ed., Plenum Publishing Corporation, New-York.Google Scholar
  20. Rona, J. P., Van De Sype, G., Cornel, D., Grignon, C., and Heller, R., 1980, Plasmolysis effect on electrical characteristics of free cells and protoplasts of Acer pseudoplatanus L., J. Bioelectrochem. Bioenerg., 7: 377.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. Schmitt, R., and Sandermann Jr., H., 1982, Specific localization of β-glucoside conjugates of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in soybean vacuoles, Z. Naturforsch., 37: 772.Google Scholar
  22. Wagner, G. J., 1983, Higher plant vacuoles and tonoplast, in: “Isolation of Membranes and Organelles from Plant Cells”, J. L. Hall, ed., Academic Press, London.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hélène Barbier-Brygoo
    • 1
  • Jean-Pierre Renaudin
    • 1
  • Pierre Manigault
    • 1
  • Yves Mathieu
    • 1
  • Armen Kurkdjian
    • 1
  • Jean Guern
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire VégétaleC.N.R.S.-I.N.R.A.Gif-sur-YvetteFrance

Personalised recommendations