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Plant Vacuoles pp 143-146 | Cite as

NBD-PC: A Tool to Study Phospholipase Activity in Protoplasts

  • Lynne A. Dengler
  • Magaly Rincon
  • Wendy F. Boss
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 134)

Abstract

Wild carrot cells can be grown in suspension culture so that they yield fusion permissive or fusogenic protoplasts (Boss et al., 1984). The presence of small vacuoles and high rates of inositol phospholipid metabolism were correlated with the high rates of fusion in these cells (Boss and Grimes, 1985). Increased phosphatidyl-inositol metabolism has been correlated with membrane fusion events such as secretory vesicle fusion with the plasma membrane (Laychock and Putney, 1982) and myoblast fusion during muscle maturation (Wakelam, 1983). Our hypothesis was that the rapid phosphatidylinositol headgroup metabolism found in the fusogenic protoplasts was indicative of a general increase in membrane lipid recycling as opposed to de novo synthesis and that increased lipid metabolism might contribute to the fusogenic state of the protoplasts.

Keywords

Myoblast Fusion Membrane Fusion Event Carrot Suspension Culture Carrot Suspension Culture Cell Carrot Protoplast 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Boss, W. F., and Grimes, H. D., 1985, Dynamics of calcium-induced fusion of fuso-genic protoplasts, in: “Beltsville Symposia on Agricultural Research. IX. Frontiers of Membrane Research in Agriculture”, J. St. John, P. Jackson, and E. Berlin, eds., Rowman Allanheld Co., Totowa, N.J.Google Scholar
  2. Boss, W. F., Grimes, H. D., and Brightman, A. O., 1984, Calcium-induced fusion of fusogenic wild carrot protoplasts, Protoplasma 120: 209.Google Scholar
  3. Boss, W. F., and Ruesink, A. W., 1979, Isolation and characterization of concanavalin A-labeled plasma membranes from carrot suspension culture cells, Plant Physiol. 65: 1005.Google Scholar
  4. Folch, J., Lees, M., and Stanley, G. H. S., 1957, A simple method for isolation and purification of total lipids from animal tissues, J. Biol. Chem. 226: 497.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Laychock, S. G., and Putney Jr., J. W., 1982, Roles of phospholipid metabolism in secretory cells, in: “Cellular Regulation of Secretion and Release”, P. M. Conn, ed., Academic Press, New-York.Google Scholar
  6. Sleight, R. G., and Pagano, R. E., 1985, Transport of a fluorescent phosphatidylcholine analog from the plasma membrane to the Golgi apparatus, J. Cell Biol., 99: 743.Google Scholar
  7. Wakelam, M. J. O., 1983, Inositol phospholipid metabolism and myoblast fusion, Biochem. J., 214: 77.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lynne A. Dengler
    • 1
  • Magaly Rincon
    • 1
  • Wendy F. Boss
    • 1
  1. 1.Botany DepartmentNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA

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