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Ultrasonic Measurements on Textured Materials

  • R. B. Mignogna
  • P. P. Delsanto
  • A. V. ClarkJr.
  • B. B. Rath
  • C. L. Vold

Abstract

Over the past 30 years the study of acoustoelasticity has gone through various stages of development. Hughes and Kelly reported their initial work on acoustoelasticity in 1953.1 Theoretically they considered materials to be homogeneous and isotropic but found limited experimental agreement with theory due to initial anisotropy. Early on, it was recognized that most materials display an initial anisotropy in regards to acoustic and acoustoelastic measurements. This was attributed to preferential grain orientation (texture). Numerous works considering ultrasonic texture measurement prior to 1973 are referenced by Green.2 Not until twenty years after Hughes and Kelly, in 1973, did Iwashimizu and Kubomura present a theory to account for both initial anisotropy and stress. The theory they proposed assumes that a homogeneous orthotropic symmetry exists in rolled plates. Their theory was found to agree rather well with experimental data and spurred renewed interest in the potential of acoustoelasticity. A number of refinements have been made using slight orthotropic symmetry as a basis. However, all of these theories consider only the macroscopic symmetry displayed by the material.3,4

Keywords

Residual Stress Rayleigh Wave Center Plane Rolled Plate Texture Coefficient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. B. Mignogna
    • 1
  • P. P. Delsanto
    • 1
  • A. V. ClarkJr.
    • 1
  • B. B. Rath
    • 1
  • C. L. Vold
    • 1
  1. 1.Naval Research LaboratoryUSA

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