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Automated Welding Process Sensing and Control

  • J. A. Johnson
  • N. M. Carlson
  • J. O. Bolstad
  • H. B. Smartt
  • M. B. Ward
  • R. T. Allemeier
  • L. A. Lott
  • D. C. Kunerth

Abstract

A welding machine requires three additional basic components for truly automated operation:
  • Sensors which detect physical properties of the weld such as reinforcement area or fracture toughness, or which detect parameters that can be related to those properties such as depth of penetration or cooling rate.

  • A model of the welding process which relates the controllable welding parameters such as current, voltage, welding speed, etc., to the physical properties of the weld.

  • A control system which takes the signals from the sensors and converts them into a form which can be used for feedback control of the weld machine.

Keywords

Heat Input Weld Pool Weld Bead Welding Current Bead Geometry 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    H. B. Smartt, C. J. Einerson, and A. D. Watkins, “Modelling and Control of Gas Metal Arc Welding,” in preparation, to be submitted to Welding Journal.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    W. E. Lukens and R. A. Morris, “Infrared Temperature Sensing of Cooling Rates for Arc Welding Control,” Welding Journal, 61, 1, January 1982, pp. 27–33.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    H. B. Smartt and J. F. Key, “An Investigation of Factors Controlling GTA Weld Bead Geometry,” Proceedings, ASM Conference on Trends in Welding Research in the United States, November 1981, New Orleans, LA.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    L. A. Lott, J. A. Johnson, and H. B. Smartt, “Real-Time Ultrasonic Sensing of Arc Welding Processes,” Proceedings, 1983 Symposium on Nondestructive Evaluation Applications and Materials Processing, p. 13–22, American Society for Metals, Metals Park, OH.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    L. A. Lott, “Ultrasonic Detection of Molten/Solid Interfaces in Weld Pools,” Materials Evaluation, 42:337–341 (1984).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    J. A. Johnson and N. M. Carlson, “Weld Energy Reduction by Using Concurrent Nondestructive Evaluation,” to be published, NDT International, June 1986.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. A. Johnson
    • 1
  • N. M. Carlson
    • 1
  • J. O. Bolstad
    • 1
  • H. B. Smartt
    • 1
  • M. B. Ward
    • 1
  • R. T. Allemeier
    • 1
  • L. A. Lott
    • 1
  • D. C. Kunerth
    • 1
  1. 1.Idaho National Engineering LaboratoryIdaho FallsUSA

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