Advertisement

Molecular Interactions of Ganglioside Receptors with Tetanotoxin on Solid Supports, Aqueous Solutions and Natural Membranes

  • Ephraim Yavin
  • Philip Lazarovici
  • Anetta Nathan
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 133)

Abstract

Homeostatic regulation of the mammalian cell is mediated, among other factors, by extrinsic signals in the form of hormones, growth substances or pharmacologically active agents which interact with specific cell surface determinants. The molecular details by which the message generated from these interactions is transduced through the lipid milieu to affect cell function are unclear.

Keywords

Sialic Acid Sialic Acid Residue Sodium Periodate Toxin Binding Nitrocellulose Paper 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    S.I. Hakomori, Ann. Rev. Biochem 50:733–764 (1981).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    E. Yavin, E. and Z. Yavin, Dev. Neurosci. 2:25–37 (1979).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    E. Yavin, Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 230:129–137 (1984).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    E. Yavin, Z. Yavin, and L.D. Kohn, J. Neurochem. 40:1212–1219 (1983).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    E. Habermann, Infections of the nervous system, in: “Handbook of Clinical Neurology,” P.J. Vinhen and G.W. Bruyh, eds., North Holland, Amsterdam (1979).Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    J.P. Robinson and J.H. Hash, Mol. Cell Biochem. 48:33–44 (1982).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    T.B. Helting and O. Zwisler, J. Biol. Chem. 252:187–193 (1977).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    C. Bizzini, in: “Receptors and Recognition,” P. Cuatrecasas, ed., Vol. IB, pp. 175–217, John Wiley Inc., New York (1977).Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    J.W. Griffin, D.L. Price, W.K. Engel, and D.B. Drachman, J. Neuropathol. Exp. Neurol. 36:214–227 (1977).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    D.L. Price, J.W. Griffin, A. Young, K. Peck, and A. Stocks, Science 188:945–947 (1975).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    K. Stoeckel, M. Schwab, and H. Thoenen, Brain Res. 132:273–285 (1977).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    E. Yavin, Z. Yavin, W.H. Habig, M.C. Hardegree, and L.D. Kbhn, J. Biol. Chem. 256:7014–7022 (1981).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    P. Lazarovici and E. Yavin, Biochlm. Biophys. Acta 812:523–531 (1985).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    P. Lazarovici and E. Yavin, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 812:532–542 (1985).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    P. Lazarovici, J.L. Tayot, and E. Yavin, Toxicon 22:401–413 (1984).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    P. Lazarovici and E. Yavin, Biochemistry, in press.Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    E. Yavin and A. Nathan, Eur. J. Biochem. 154:403–407 (1986).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    A. Nathan and E. Yavin, Submitted for publication.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
    J. Holmgren, H. Elwing, P. Eredman, and L. Svennerholm, Eur. J. Biochem. 106:371–379 (1980).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    L.A. Greene and A.S. Tischler, Adv. Cell Neurobiol. 3:373–414 (1982).Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    W. Seifert, in: “Gangliosides in Neurological and Neuromuscular Function, Development and Repair,” M.M. Rapport and A. Gorio, eds., pp. 99–117, Raven Press, New York (1981).Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    R.K. Margolis, S.R.J. Salton, and R.U. Margolis,J. Biol. Chem. 258:4110–4117 (1983).PubMedGoogle Scholar
  23. 23.
    P. Lazarovici and E. Yavin, in: “7th Int. Conference on Tetanus,” G. Nistico, P. Mastroeni, and M. Pitzurra, eds., pp. 29–48, Gangemi Pub. Co., Rome (1985).Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    A.W. Dalziel, G. Lipka, B.Z. Chowdhry, J.M. Sturtevant and D.E. Schafer, Molec. Cell Biochem. 63:83–91 (1984).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  25. 25.
    G. Schwarzmann, W. Mraz, J. Sattler, R. Schindler, and H. Wiegandt, Hoppe-Seyler’s Z. Physiol. Chem. 359:1277–1286 (1978).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. 26.
    W. Mraz, G. Schwartzmann, J. Sattler, T. Momoi, B. Seemann and H. Wiegandt, Hoppe-Seyler f s Z. Physiol. Chem. 361:177–185 (1980).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. 27.
    H. Wiegandt, in: “Advances in Oftopharmacology, “B. Ceccareli and R. Clementi, eds., Vol. 3, pp. 17–25, Raven Press, New York (1979).Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    A.L. Stone and E.H. Kolodny, Chem. Phys. Lipids 6:274–279 (1971).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    C. Cestaro, J. Barenholz, and S. Gatt, Biochemistry 19:615–619 (1980).PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. 30.
    C.W.M. Grant, in: “Membrane Fluidity in Biology,” R.C. Aloia, ed., pp. 131–150, Academic Press, New York (1983).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ephraim Yavin
    • 1
  • Philip Lazarovici
    • 1
  • Anetta Nathan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurobiologyThe Weizmann Institute of ScienceRehovotIsrael

Personalised recommendations