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Fate and Expression of Vector DNA in Plant Cells

  • Armin P. Czernilofsky
  • Barbara Baker
  • Bruno Gronenborn
  • Rüdiger Hain
  • Chris Leaver
  • Volker Matzeit
  • Ian Moore
  • Joachim Schalk
  • Uwe Wirtz
  • Jeff Schell
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 41)

Abstract

Plant transformation systems based on gene vectors derived from the Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens (16), on direct DNA uptake (6), and on wheat dwarf virus (WDV) DNA (14) were used to introduce a number of chimeric genes into, respectively, tobacco protoplasts, suspension culture cells of Triticum monococcum, and Zea mays. The actual genes involved in these studies were chosen to serve as models for investigating the fate, expression, recombination, and transposition of foreign DNA in plant cells.

Keywords

Suspension Culture Cell Coat Protein Gene NPTII Gene Selectable Marker Gene Chloramphenicol Acetyl Transferase 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Armin P. Czernilofsky
    • 1
  • Barbara Baker
    • 1
  • Bruno Gronenborn
    • 1
  • Rüdiger Hain
    • 1
  • Chris Leaver
    • 2
  • Volker Matzeit
    • 1
  • Ian Moore
    • 1
  • Joachim Schalk
    • 1
  • Uwe Wirtz
    • 1
  • Jeff Schell
    • 1
  1. 1.Max-Planck-Institut für ZüchtungsforschungVogelsangKöln 30Federal Republic of Germany
  2. 2.Department of BotanyUniversity of EdinburghEdinburghUK

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