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Multifrequency ESR of an Isotopically Enriched Copper System in the Immobilized Phase: A Monte Carlo Approach

  • R. Basosi
  • M. Pasenkiewicz-Gierula
  • W. Froncisz
  • W. Enrico Antholine
  • A. Jesmanowicz
  • J. Steven Hyde

Abstract

Often the only ESR parameters reported from the spectrum of an immobilized copper complex are g‖ and A‖Cu and the presence or absence of nitrogen hyperfine lines. Here, experimental ESR spectra are used to show the improvement in resolution if a single isotope of copper, 63Cu or 65Cu, and 15N donor atoms are incorporated into the complex. The second derivative spectrum enhances the resolution of the nitrogen hyperfine structure. The Fourier transform of the ESR spectrum separates peaks for hyperfine lines with large couplings from lines with small couplings. Multifrequency spectra and their simulations lead to a full set of ESR parameters which include g-values, A-values, line widths, line positions, and strain parameters.

Keywords

Derivative Spectrum Strain Parameter Hyperfine Coupling Constant Hyperfine Line Single Isotope 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Basosi
    • 1
  • M. Pasenkiewicz-Gierula
    • 2
  • W. Froncisz
    • 2
  • W. Enrico Antholine
    • 3
  • A. Jesmanowicz
    • 3
  • J. Steven Hyde
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of Physical ChemistryUniversity of SienaItaly
  2. 2.Dept. of Biophysics, Institute of Molecular BiologyJagiellonian UniversityKrakowPoland
  3. 3.National Biomedical ESR CenterThe Medical College of Wisconsin MilwaukeeWisconsinUSA

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