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Emission Spectroscopy

  • H.-J. Kunze
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (ASIB, volume 149)

Abstract

Although light scattering may be considered already a subfield of emission spectroscopy, if this is defined in the broadest sense, orthodox emission spectroscopy commonly is understood to be concerned with the electromagnetic radiation emitted from plasmas without external influence on the radiators. The main objective usually is to obtain information on the plasma state, i.e. for example, on temperatures, densities, plasma composition, magnetic and electric fields, or waves excited in the plasma. This is certainly only possible to that extent that these parameters influence sufficiently the emitted electromagnetic radiation. For applications, on the other hand, one may simply be interested in the emitted spectrum of a specific discharge.

Keywords

Plasma Column Emission Coefficient Visible Spectral Region Ionization Stage Spectral Line Broadening 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • H.-J. Kunze
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für ExperimentalphysikRuhr-UniversitätBochumFR Germany

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