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A Follow-Up Electromyographic Investigation of ALS Patients Treated with High Dosage Gangliosides

  • P. Pinelli
  • L. Mazzini
  • G. Mora
  • F. Pisano
  • A. Villani
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 209)

Abstract

In the last ten years many studies have shown that Bovine Brain Gangliosides (BBG) may play a role in synaptic transmission for the storage of neurotransmitters such as serotonin[1]; they interact with adenylcyclase and with phosphodiesterase for the synthesis and degradation of cyclic AMP[2]; they can facilitate axonal sprouting[3] and also modulate the stability of the neural membrane[4].

Keywords

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Survive Motor Neuron Extensor Digitorum Extensor Digitorum Brevis Voluntary Recruitment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Pinelli
    • 1
  • L. Mazzini
    • 2
  • G. Mora
    • 3
  • F. Pisano
    • 3
  • A. Villani
    • 3
  1. 1.Ist Neurological ClinicUniversity Medical School, S. Paolo HospitalMilanItaly
  2. 2.Dept. Physical Therapy and RehabilitationVeruno (NO)Italy
  3. 3.Dept. Neurology, “Cl. Lavoro Foundation”Institute of Care and Research Medical Centre of RehabilitationVeruno (NO)Italy

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